Blogging, Current Events, and So On

You have probably notices that I have not commented on many of the recent events, aside from weather, fires, and the like. There are a few reasons for that.

One, so much is tied in with US politics, and this isn’t a dedicated political commentary blog. There are other people who have a lot more background and interest in the political system and what it does.

Two, I’m a historian by training. We generally try to follow the thirty-year rule. This “rule” comes from two sources: classification time-limits in the US used to be thirty years, and the idea of a generation. What you live through is current events. What your parents lived through is history. Distance is supposed to allow 1) greater access to sources from a wider span of view points, and 2) dispassion. I have no personal dog in the fight over whether Holy Roman Emperor Charles V was a well-meaning, decent ruler or a tool of the AntiChrist and incompetent to boot, so I can opine away and show sources and documents. The legacy of the Presidents Bush? No, staying out of that.

Three is the language limit on this blog. Right now, I’m inclined to voice uncharitable thoughts using Anglo-Saxon and related verbiage.

Four, this blog is, when it comes down to cases, about selling books and stories, and entertaining my readers. People read fiction to get away, to escape into the lives of people different from they are, to get a happy ending where the forces of evil are defeated, the guy and the girl get hitched, and everyone can pay their bills in full and on time. Even if Arthur is losing to the computer 2:3, again. Sometimes I will wander into personal musings and views, but I’m trying to keep things lighter, or at least more diverting. My job is to divert my readers from current events, after all.

26 thoughts on “Blogging, Current Events, and So On

  1. I appreciate the effort you put into staying away from the foibles and worse of the great and powerful, and of the small and the silly–and also from the difficulties of distinguishing between those two groups. This is respite from the weights of the world, and quite welcome. And maybe needed

  2. Please keep avoiding politics and current events. There are plenty of other blogs for those sort of topics.

  3. Very much appreciated, ma’am. The benefit of the history and geography postings is that we get a longer-term, dispassionate view of many instances of Things Going Wrong, which should help with personal understanding of current affairs (emphasis on personal). I’m delighted to find a lighter-toned spielgrund for relief from other woes.

  4. The tone poems describing the weather on your walks are appreciated. And a good way to flex your literary muscles.

  5. Only inclined towards Anglo Saxon verbiage?

    At this point, I have trouble describing it with any other language!

    • After reviewing the week’s events and trying to understand a problem in compiling an application, I was getting ready to start swearing at in CMake. (Got around it; the INSTALL file’s directions worked perfectly so long as one did *exactly* what it said to do. Trying to use a different system was going to hurt.)

      Thank you for the snippets and everything else in your blog entries. It’s been over a half century since I was able to sing in a single key*, but the choir bits are wonderful.

      (*) One might graciously say my singing is atonal.

  6. Thank you for an escape from the constant hammering of 24/7 news cycle and in your face self righteous people. I’ve blown through all my Anglo Saxon phrases and thinking of learning Gaelic.

    • Trying to sing along with Japanese rap or similar can help– if I can stop thinking for long enough, even growling out Ramstein (sp?) works.

      …I’ve had success using German cookie names as cursewords, though, so YMMV.

  7. The last Great Environmental Crisis before Global Warmening was the idea that we were sucking the Ogalala (sp?) Aquifer dry. The last time I heard about that one was before 9/11, so that’s at least 20 years. Is that too soon to give us an update? Is that still a concern, or was there some sort of “oops, nevermind” that didn’t get wide coverage?

  8. Thanks for keeping this blog as you do.
    It is often mybfirst read of the morning, so that I can have my first cup of coffee in peace.
    John

  9. Thank you! Not only for the insightful newsletter/blog (not sure of the terminology for what I receive from you), but for doing what you’re doing. I don’t watch TV these days except for during my one meal a day (choice, not necessity), and then it’s usually reruns of NCIS, a spinoff, Midsomer Murders, etc. My news is from MSNBC, and things are generally so depressing I’m down to checking it less than once a day.

    So regularly hearing from you and either learning something or smiling or laughing (particularly the latter when hearing things in the hallway *S*) is greatly appreciated.

    Again, thanks.

  10. “whether Holy Roman Emperor Charles V was a well-meaning, decent ruler or a tool of the AntiChrist and incompetent to boot,” What? Are those supposed to be mutually exclusive or something?
    I suppose that in the environs of Flat State, one may also be occasionally exposed to and absorb Latin verbiage. I gather that even Miss Deborah has picked some Teutonic verbiage, although as a polite young lady, she seems not use it. (Aloud. Much. Where adults can hear.)

  11. I very much appreciate you NOT commenting on current events as i seem to get too much of that elsewhere, so it is a relief to come here and enjoy what is on here and I also enjoy the overheard in the Hallway snippets as well as everything else.

    • As a retired teacher, I REALLY appreciate the “Overheard in the Hallway” snippets!

  12. People read fiction to get away, to escape into the lives of people different from they are, to get a happy ending where the forces of evil are defeated, the guy and the girl get hitched, and everyone can pay their bills in full and on time. Even if Arthur is losing to the computer 2:3, again.

    Which rings true.

    Happy doesn’t mean nothing ever goes annoying, after all.

  13. I’m wondering if the hunger for ‘escapism’ isn’t a desire, at least in part, to see life beyond one’s own narrow confines, and to remember that there are good stories to find as well as endless streams of misery.

  14. Agree with your policy and thank you. It also encourages people with very different political opinions to all feel welcome here, which I appreciate.

  15. Your blog is where I go to start my day with a smile. History, writing snippets, Overheard in the Halls, and more are a welcome respite from what is going on outside. Thank you.

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